Saliva Hypernatrium: An Exploratory Review


Saliva Hypernatrium is a term developed by La Trobe University Public Health Palliative Care Unit Researchers (Dr. Lindsay Carey [Senior Research Fellow], Dr. Christa Carey-Sargeant [Speech Pathologist] and Lillian Krikheli [Speech Pathologist]) in Melbourne Australia (01 August 2019), to describe a seemingly rare medical condition of having excessive sodium within human saliva, that is not caused by another known condition (e.g., Sjogren syndrome, dehydration, hypersalivation, bacteria, nutritional deficiency, dry mouth, oral infection/oral bleeding, acid or bile reflux). A full report will be available via Research Online: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.9/568632. Progressive detail about Saliva Hypernatrium will be updated via Wikiversity.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: This scoping review explored the available peer-reviewed literature, plus medical/health information management records, case studies, expert opinions in the field of otolaryngology, and other relevant resources relating to the condition of idiopathic persistent and excessive salty tasting saliva, labelled by the authors as ‘Saliva Hypernatrium’. Method: An exploratory scoping review was conducted using the Arksey and O’Malley (2005) method to source key literature and other resources. Results: A total of 684 articles were initially identified using search terms derived from conditions relating to taste, salt and saliva. A total of 12 articles were found to be specifically relevant. Six key themes were discernible from the 12 articles which identified possible causes for salty saliva having no currently known medical cause. Discussion & Conclusion: This scoping review explored the available peer-reviewed literature, plus medical/health information management records, case studies, expert opinions in the field of otolaryngology, and other relevant resources relating to the condition of idiopathic persistent and excessive salty tasting saliva, labelled by the authors as ‘Saliva Hypernatrium’